Art for Kids: Inspired by Gustav Klimt

 

The other day I was driving through my neighborhood when a bright orange sign caught my attention. I slammed on the brakes (after quickly checking my rear view mirror – safety first!) pulled into a parking space and just sat staring at a new store. An art supply store. Cue dramatic music…

Although I live in a huge city, Toronto, our neighborhood was totally lacking in a good quality store to buy my favourite things in, art supplies of course! Before this lovely location opened I would go on an epic trek downtown, stock up on supplies and fight the traffic or hop on the subway home. This is a life changer for an arts and crafter like me. And it helped me gather the supplies I needed for my next ‘test project’.

I have been working my way through  The Print and Stamp Lab by Traci Bunkers.

It’s a great book for beginners (like me) and shows you how to turn just about anything into a stamp tool or printing block. I scooped up a brayer and block printing ink at the art supply store and quickly got to work.

Gather your supplies:

  • foam plate (this is a recycled meat tray)
  • black paper, (use a good quality paper, I used Artagain)
  • brayer
  • block printing ink
  • metallic pens
  • ballpoint pen to carve the foam with your design

I have had a Gustav Klimt project on my to-do list for a few months. I found it at Panther’s Palette, a great blog by Pam, an art teacher.

I started by using a ball point pen to carve a whimsical tree onto the foam. I then squeezed out a dollop of printing ink onto the back of a baking tray and rolled my brayer across it.  Then I rolled the brayer across my carved foam and tested it a few times to see how it worked.

I was disappointed with the foam tray I was using. It was quite uneven and it was difficult to smooth the paint across. The next time I try this project I might use a linoleum block and carve it or just try to find a smoother foam. Also, I tried regular acrylic ink and it was too runny and filled the carved lines.

And there you go:

I have fallen in love with my new brayer and can’t wait to try a million more projects. Kids from about the age of 6 onwards would be able to complete this project. There are so many variations to try.

Let me know what you think…comments totally make my day!

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1 Comment

Filed under Art for Kids

One response to “Art for Kids: Inspired by Gustav Klimt

  1. Sinta Jimenez

    Definitely checking out that books, looks like a great resource!

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